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Downbeat global economy doesn’t mean disaster

Negative global economy growth need not spell disaster. Strong forces that are causing widespread recession fears will eventually fade. However, there will be some obstacles in the way.

There has been an increase in recession talk as we enter the new year. There is growing concern about a downturn everywhere from Singapore to Washington. Despite the fact that there are valid reasons to be pessimistic about the state of the world economy, 2023 doesn’t have to be written off. Given the general pessimism, it might even work out reasonably well.

Significant factors that have lowered expectations are likely to fade. The reopening of China will be difficult and may first undermine commerce. Even if it doesn’t come close to matching the kinds of numbers that typified its heyday in the very first decade of the century, the world needs a China that is on its feet. The planet’s No. 2 power will be more capable than it is right now by the end of the year.

Interest rates in the major economies are probably going to pause their jarring upward march that started in 2022. Politicians are now beginning to discuss this possibility, which was previously viewed as reckless.

Global Economy

Cuts are a divisive concept. The Federal Open Market Committee’s December meeting minutes, which were made public on Wednesday, issued a caution against expecting reductions any time soon. It’s a logical next step after a pause, despite officials’ reluctance to accept such a change.

It makes sense to be concerned about the state of the economy. The year had only been going for a few hours when major exporter South Korea reported another decline in shipments. Prime Minister named Lee Hsien Loong of Singapore had just finished warning citizens that 2023 would be difficult because the US and Europe were facing a recession.

Pay attention when a city-state that rises or falls to the rhythm of global capitalism sends up such a flare. According to central bankers, in order to reduce inflation, unemployment must increase. You should never be OK if you receive a pink slip.

Gains on the bond markets at the start of the week were reminiscent of those at the beginning of 2001, when the Fed quickly lowered rates as the economy slowed. At the time, as they are now, concerns about a downturn were valid. But in comparison to the depressions of 2007–2009 and 2020, the eight-month recession that started in March of that year was brief.

downbeat global economy doesn't mean disaster | flipboard

The panel that forecasts the peaks and troughs of American business cycles noted that the duration was marginally shorter than the average since World War II. (Japan and Germany both slipped into contraction.)

Speaking of the Fed of yesteryear, former chair Alan Greenspan recently declared that a recession this time around is the “most likely outcome.” Greenspan orchestrated a surprise rate cut in the first days of 2001. Despite how alluring doomsday predictions can be, it’s crucial to keep in mind that the global economy grew by about 2.5% in 2001. Recessions, if we are indeed headed for one, don’t have to be the end of the world, despite never being pleasant. Perhaps the severity of the last two dips has left us scarred.

China was recording astounding numbers in 2001. The nation was on its way to achieving all the lofty goals to which we had grown accustomed, including becoming the world’s workshop. Over the past few years, that talk has diminished. Over the past year, Beijing’s response to the pandemic has come under heavy fire. From being the world’s shock absorber, China now underperforms.

However, Covid controls are currently being removed by President Xi Jinping. Wei He and Thomas Gatley of Gavekal Dragonomics stated in a Wednesday note that “a strong economic recovery is on the way,” despite the fact that public health headlines would continue to be unfavourable for another month or two, or even slightly longer.

Though it’s more difficult to predict, the monetary policy outlook. After the most pronounced tightening of the world economy in a generation, even a pause would be significant. Although Fed officials seem to be united in their opposition to a less aggressive strategy, the US may be a laggard rather than a leading indicator. Despite all the talk about India’s economy being one of the pivots of the twenty-first century, little attention is paid to what the Reserve Bank of India says and does. That must stop now.

One of the most significant decisions in recent weeks was made by longtime RBI policy committee hawk Jayanth Rama Varma, who has recently changed his mind. Varma disagreed with the bank’s increase in December. According to him, the most recent action puts “an unwarranted risk to economic growth.”

If they haven’t already, more people might start to agree with Varma’s viewpoints, especially if inflation continues to decline. The Reserve Bank of Australia recently disclosed that a pause was considered for December but that the board ultimately decided on an increase of one quarter point. This month’s predicted increase in South Korea will probably be the last one. Even though they result from less vigorous activity, these are encouraging signs. A change in direction is imminent.

By the year 2024, things will be in a better state. There will only be a few hiccups on the way. Speaking of the Fed of yesteryear, former chair Alan Greenspan recently declared that a recession this time around is the “most likely outcome.” Greenspan orchestrated a surprise rate cut in the first days of 2001. Despite how alluring doomsday predictions can be, it’s crucial to keep in mind that the global economy grew by about 2.5% in 2001. Recessions, if we are indeed headed for one, don’t have to be the end of the world, despite never being pleasant. Perhaps the severity of the last two dips has left us scarred.

5 economic challenges that await us in 2023

China was recording astounding numbers in 2001. The nation was on its way to achieving all the lofty goals to which we had grown accustomed, including becoming the world’s workshop. Over the past few years, that talk has diminished. Over the past year, Beijing’s response to the pandemic has come under heavy fire. From being the world’s shock absorber, China now underperforms.

However, Covid controls are currently being removed by President Xi Jinping. Wei He and Thomas Gatley of Gavekal Dragonomics stated in a Wednesday note that “a strong economic recovery is on the way,” despite the fact that public health headlines would continue to be unfavourable for another month or two, or even slightly longer.

Though it’s more difficult to predict, the monetary policy outlook. After the most pronounced tightening of the world economy in a generation, even a pause would be significant. Although Fed officials seem to be united in their opposition to a less aggressive strategy, the US may be a laggard rather than a leading indicator. Despite all the talk about India’s economy being one of the pivots of the twenty-first century, little attention is paid to what the Reserve Bank of India says and does.

downbeat global economy doesn't mean disaster | newstrack english 1

That must stop now. One of the most significant decisions in recent weeks was made by longtime RBI policy committee hawk Jayanth Rama Varma, who has recently changed his mind. Varma disagreed with the bank’s increase in December. According to him, the most recent action puts “an unwarranted risk to economic growth.”

If they haven’t already, more people might start to agree with Varma’s viewpoints, especially if inflation continues to decline. The Reserve Bank of Australia recently disclosed that a pause was considered for December but that the board ultimately decided on an increase of one quarter point. This month’s predicted increase in South Korea will probably be the last one. Even though they result from less vigorous activity, these are encouraging signs. A change in direction is imminent.

By the year 2024, things will be in a better state. There will only be a few hiccups on the way.

edited and proofread by nikita sharma

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